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Libertarian women’s history month: Lynn Kinsky

26 Mar
Lynn Kinsky (May 22, 194? – ) grew up in Hialeah, Florida, graduating from Hialeah High School in 1962, and going to college at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  With her then husband engineer Robert Poole and attorney Manual Klausner she took over reason magazine from its creator Lanny Friedlander and helped expand it into what it has become today.  Kinsky wrote for reason in the 1970s, as well as for the Association of Libertarian Feminists.

In an interview on the early years of reason magazine, Kinsky said getting reason out on time placed stress on her marriage: “reason took up all of my free time. Bob was more efficient at working than I was. I got writer’s block. I wound up doing all the copy editing. At that time every Randroid and libertarian wannabe sent in their philosophical treatises, and my job was to make it readable. I’d come home from work—I was also going to grad school—and start copyediting. For four or five years I didn’t see any TV, didn’t have any life other than reason.

“When putting an issue to bed, we all got together, Tibor, me, Bob, Tibor’s wife at that time, Marilynn Walther, had a big social work session. Several times [academic philosopher and first Libertarian presidential candidate] John Hospers, who lived nearby, would bring us a big pot of borscht. Libertarians would show up from the community in Southern California.

“And we would meet our deadlines. That set us apart from the run-of-the-mill libertarian magazine. That was courtesy of Bob. It was stressful to our marriage, but it did get the magazine out on time.”

In an article “Defending Tolerance,” in the September 1975 issue of reason, Kinsky was an early advocate of marriage equality:

“…libertarians should try to develop a sympathetic comprehension of what being a homosexual in this society involves, and the sort of legal discrimination a homosexual encounters. For instance, a lesbian can be virtually assured of losing her children if their custody ever gets called into question (as in a divorce case)-her sexual orientation is considered by most courts to be prima facie evidence of her unfitness to be a mother. The marriage laws are obviously discriminatory and thereby deny to homosexual couples legal benefits granted to heterosexual marrieds-lower tax rates, immunity from being forced to testify against a spouse, etc. Probably the most blatantly homophobic institution in our society is the military and security establishment. The armed forces’ refusal to allow homosexuals to join or to stay in the military reaches beyond the issue of whether homosexuals should have a chance to receive the training, pensions, and other benefits their tax dollars are paying for-veteran status and an honorable discharge affect a man’s chances of getting a job, being admitted to a school, receiving preferential insurance rates, etc. (Note that I am not talking about a private business discriminating against homosexuals-libertarians certainly recognize the right to discriminate so long as no force is involved. I am talking about private business using a government certification and the government’s using some nonrelevant criterion in awarding it.) An inability to get a security clearance (even where they don’t present a security risk) can cut a homosexual off from employment in any company holding government contracts and in fact can close whole industries to homosexuals.”

In recent years Kinsky has become an equestrienne, riding in more than 2,000 competitive trail miles in 60 North American Trail Ride Conference events, all on Peruvian Pasos. More than 1,710 of those miles were logged aboard her black gelding, El Sinchi Roca (Sinchi). Today, she owns a dozen of the smooth- moving equines.  “I enjoy NATRC so much, because you get to ride beautiful wilderness trails, many not normally open to the public,” she says. “And at the same time, riders learn valuable lessons in horsemanship, how to take care of their horses over challenging trails, and how to lessen wear and tear on their horses.”


In early 2015 Kinsky suffered a stroke.

(Libertarian) Women’s History month: Tonie Nathan

5 Mar

Tonie Nathan, R.I.P. (The First Woman to Receive an Electoral Vote for Vice President)

Tonie Nathan was the first woman and the first Jewish American to receive an Electoral College vote, decades before Geraldine Ferraro or Joseph Leiberman, when she was the (first) Vice Presidential candidate for the Libertarian Party in 1972.  (I met her in 2012 at the Libertarian Party nominating convention, less than two years before she passed away in March last year.)

Dates: February 9, 1923 – March 20, 2014
Known for: First woman to receive an electoral vote (in a United States presidential election) — Libertarian Party candidate for vice president in 1972, with John Hospers
Occupation: political candidate, public relations consultant, freelance writer, insurance agent, music publisher, business manager, radio and television talk show host
Also known as: Theodora Nathalia Nathan
Education
  • University of Oregon; B.A., Journalism, 1971
  • some graduate work
Marriage:
  • husband: Charles (Chuck) Nathan (composer)
About Tonie Nathan:
Tonie Nathan was born in New York, lived for a time in California, and moved to Oregon.
She ran several businesses and was a talk show host on KVAL-TV and several radio programs.
In 1972, Tonie Nathan was nominated by the Libertarian Party, which she had helped found, as candidate for vice president, with John Hospers nominated for president. The Libertarian Party was on the ballot in two states and received about 3,000 votes total. Roger L. MacBride, a Republican elector, cast his electoral vote for Hospers and Nathan rather than for the Nixon and Agnew ticket.
In 1976, Tonie Nathan ran for Congress as an independent and in 1980 she ran for the Senate as a Libertarian.
In 1977, Bella Abzug appointed Tonie Nathan as a delegate-at-large to the National Conference of Women.
Tonie Nathan remained politically active and worked as a public relations consultant and writer, including promoting her husband’s musicals.  Later she and her family owned a company that sold custom blinds and shutters
Organizations: Libertarian Party, Association of Libertarian Feminists


Pictured:  1972 Libertarian Vice Presidential candidate Tonie Nathan with 1980 Presidential candidate Ed Clark and wife Alicia Clark

Roger McBride, in memorium

4 Mar

Most Libertarians don’t realize that the LP’s first two presidential candidates were both gay (in addition to its first vice presidential candidate being a Jewish woman).  John Hospers, the 1972 candidate, a philosophy professor in southern California, was actually kind of out by early 70s standards, as academia somewhat allowed.  (Among gays in the libertarian movement who knew him, the late Hospers was snarkily called behind his back (in the 80s), “Hot-spurs.”  I don’t actually know why.)

Roger McBride, the 1976 LP candidate, was not out.  But among his many historical firsts and other accomplishments he is the first gay member of the Electoral College to vote for an openly gay presidential candidate.

Roger MacBride

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Roger MacBride
Personal details
Born Roger Lea MacBride
August 6, 1929
New Rochelle, New York
Died March 5, 1995 (aged 65)
Miami Beach, Florida
Political party Republican Party
Libertarian Party
Profession Attorney, writer, television producer
Roger Lea MacBride (August 6, 1929 – March 5, 1995) was an American lawyer, political figure, writer and television producer. He was the presidential nominee of the Libertarian Party in the 1976 election. MacBride became the first presidential elector in U.S. history to cast a vote for a woman when, in the presidential election of 1972, he voted for the Libertarian Party candidates John Hospers for president and Theodora “Tonie” Nathan for vice president.[1][2]
He was co-creator and co-producer of the television series Little House on the Prairie.

Background[edit]

MacBride was born in New Rochelle, New York in 1929.[3] He called himself “the adopted grandson” of a family friend, writer and political theorist Rose Wilder Lane,[4] whom he met for the first time when he was 14 years of age.[5][6] Lane — the daughter of writer Laura Ingalls Wilder, who was noted for writing the Little House series of books – designated MacBride as a “political disciple”, as well as her executor and sole heir.[3]
MacBride was a graduate of Princeton University and Harvard Law School.[3]

Law career[edit]

MacBride worked for the Wall Street-based law firm White & Case for several years before opening a small practice in Vermont.[3] By the mid-1970s, MacBride had relocated toVirginia and was no longer practicing law full-time.[2]

Writing and television producing career[edit]

MacBride inherited Lane’s estate including rights to the substantial Ingalls-Wilder literary estate, including the “Little House on the Prairie” franchise.[3] He is the author of record of three additional “Little House” books, and began the “Rocky Ridge Years” series of children’s novels, describing Lane’s Ozark childhood.[3][4] He published two books onconstitutional law – The American Electoral College and Treaties versus the Constitution,[7] as well as a Libertarian Party manifesto – A New Dawn for America: The Libertarian Challenge.[3]
In the 1970s, MacBride co-created the television series Little House on the Prairie and served as a co-producer for the show.[2][4]

Political career[edit]

Vermont politics[edit]

MacBride was elected to the Vermont House of Representatives in 1962 and served one term.[8] Running as a Goldwater Republican,[9] he made an unsuccessful bid for theRepublican Party nomination for Governor of Vermont in 1964.[7][8][10]

1972 electoral vote[edit]

MacBride was the treasurer of the Republican Party of Virginia in 1972 and one of the party’s electors when Richard Nixon won the popular vote for his second term as President of the United States.[11] MacBride, however, as a “faithless elector“, voted for the nominees of the Libertarian Party – presidential candidate John Hospers and vice-presidential candidate Tonie Nathan. In so doing, MacBride made Nathan the first woman in U.S. history to receive an electoral vote.[7][11] Political pundit David Boaz later commented inLiberty magazine that MacBride was “faithless to Nixon and Agnew, anyway, but faithful to the constitutional principles Rose Wilder Lane had instilled in him.”[12]

1976 presidential campaign[edit]

After casting his historical electoral vote in 1972,[7] MacBride instantly gained favor within the fledgling Libertarian Party, which had only begun the previous year.[13] As the Libertarian presidential nominee in 1976,[2] he achieved ballot access in 32 states;[3] he and his running mateDavid Bergland,[14] received 172,553 (0.21%) popular votes by official count, and no electoral votes. His best performance was in Alaska, where he received 6,785 votes, or nearly 5.5%.[7][15]

Republican Liberty Caucus[edit]

MacBride rejoined the Republican Party in the 1980s and helped establish the Republican Liberty Caucus, a group promoting libertarian principles within the Republican Party.[4][16] He chaired this group from 1992 until his death in 1995.[17]

Death[edit]

MacBride died of heart failure on March 5, 1995.[3] A controversy ensued upon his death when the local library in Mansfield, Missouri, contended that Wilder’s original will gave her daughter ownership of the literary estate for her lifetime only, and that all rights were to revert to the Laura Ingalls Wilder Library after her death.[18] The ensuing court case was settled in an undisclosed manner, but MacBride’s heirs retained the rights.[19]
In an obituary for MacBride, David Boaz wrote, “In some ways he was the last living link to the best of the Old Right, the rugged-individualist, anti-New Deal, anti-interventionistspirit of Rep. Howard BuffettAlbert Jay NockH. L. MenckenIsabel Paterson, and Lane.”[12]