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Clintons in the Crossfire

15 Oct
Published yesterday at The Daily Caller.

Hillary Clinton is finally facing the sniper fire she “imagined” she caught in Bosnia as First Lady.   Roger Stone’s The Clintons’ War on Women is published today, on the day Hillary finally has to debate the other Democratic candidates – an ordeal the Democratic National Committee and Debbie Wasserman-Schultz have tried to spare her, by cutting down the number of debates from the 28 held in the 2008 primaries to only 6 this time around.

The book recounts the stories of about two dozen women, beginning with one of Bill Clinton’s college classmates, who have stepped forward to claim that President Clinton sexually assaulted them.  Some of the women received settlements of hundreds of thousands of dollars, some of whom claim to have had their pets killed, their jobs terminated, their businesses audited by the IRS, their tires slashed, or to have received odd phone calls or queries from strange bypassing joggers about the health of their children.

That’s just the first 100 pages of the book, which with footnotes and bibliography runs to almost 500 pages.   That only brings us up through Bill Clinton being elected President, and doesn’t even get us to Monica Lewinsky.  Nor to Stone’s narrative on Hillary Clinton and Chelsea Clinton, who he argues are also at war against women.  Nor to tales of drug sales, money laundering, and other chicanery.

But it does raise a question:  what kind of sociopath would actually have a child by a serial rapist?  Or even by someone who seems to be routinely accused of sexual assaults?

According to Stone, Hillary Clinton’s sociopathy isn’t that deep.  Chelsea Clinton is not Bill Clinton’s child, and has had extensive plastic surgery, both to make herself more attractive (were any First Children other than the Fords ever good looking?) and to make herself less the spitting image of her real dad, Web Hubbell.  Stone’s co-author Robert Morrow  asked Chelsea Clinton about this at a book signing this week.  (Chelsea calmly answered him and is now being praised even by Hillary critics like Sean Hannity.)

But Hillary is implicated in the huge apparatus to manage and clean up Bill’s “messes,” something alluded to in the book and movie Primary Colors.  Beginning with Arkansas state troopers who hushed up Clinton’s crimes when he was Governor, reported by then conservative journalist (and now on the Soros payroll and a Hillary flak) David Brock.  (It’s funny to watch “progressives” like the New York Times Frank Rich argue that powerful people don’t use the police to persecute little people who might threaten their rise to power, in a year when the same “progressives” lionize the BlackLivesMatter movement that claims police routinely abuse the powerless.)  Bill Clinton’s sexual appetites seem to require a staff to manage:  volunteers, interns, and employees to be the objects of his lust; state troopers, White House lawyers, and PR flaks to pay off, intimidate, and smear them if they go public; and post-Presidency, billionaire friend Jeffery Epstein to provide young girls on private jets to secluded  estates in the Virgin Islands.

(Coincidentally, about 14 years ago I went to a fundraiser for gay and lesbian Democrats thrown at the Georgetown home of a Clinton appointee.  Bill Clinton had crowed about how he appointed more LGBT people than any president ever had, including Bruce Lehman, the first openly gay Assistant Secretary confirmed by the Senate, James Hormel, the first gay Ambassador, and Bob Hattoy, the first AIDS victim to speak at a Democratic National Convention.    At the time I traveled socially with the LGBT Democratic crowd, selling some Clinton political appointees and staffers houses, and becoming close friends with mainly several of the lesbian LGBT Democrats.

The day after this particular fundraiser, an oddly affect-less bespectacled woman, the executive assistant to the Clinton appointee hosting the festivities, who had been at the event, called to ask if I would be available to go out with Mr. Appointee.  I replied that if he managed to call me himself I would give him an answer.  That may have been too uppity a reply, as I never got that call.  I now wonder if not being able to manage your own social life without a staff was part of the Clinton regime’s culture.  As we know from her emails, Hillary can’t drive, is unable to figure out a fax machine or an Ipad, and doesn’t know how to read TV guide.  So perhaps like Hillary, Bill really needed assistance to manage his affairs.)

It’s a fascinating book about an unseemly topic.  Stone (and co-author Robert Morrow) mention Peter Schweizer’s book Clinton Cash as a companion volume; Stone says he is covering the non-financial crimes of the Clintons.  Some fans of Schweizer’s book will no doubt think Stone is muddying the water with the Clinton’s un-drycleaned laundry.  But Stone details how many courtiers cover up for the Clintons just to advance their careers, and how many major networks and national journalists have shelved or delayed stories about the women Bill is alleged to have assaulted and Hillary is alleged to have threatened, until after various elections or impeachment trials had been decided.  So perhaps it’s really more a companion volume to Marc Leibovich’s fantastic book on D.C.’s political class,  This Town.  Maybe This Town:  After Dark.


Roger Stone parts ways with Trump campaign

8 Aug

Roger Stone, advisor to Gary Johnson’s 2012 campaign and a rumored 2016 Florida Libertarian Senatorial candidate, has either  quit or been fired from his role as an advisor to the Trump campaign.

Stone currently writes on politics at his website TheStoneZone and was famously an advisor to Nixon.  His former wife, Ann Stone, is a libertarian/Objectivist active in D.C.  in national GOP politics, with Republicans for Choice and other groups.

Roger Stone, LBJ, and Public Choice Theory: Notes from my homework

20 Nov
I’ve recently been in a graduate school course that surveys both microeconomics and public choice theory, which led me to observe that the standard critique of voting proferred by some libertarians  is actually a simplifying, and perhaps overly simplistic and fallacious, model of reality, in much the same way the neoclassical model of perfect competition is.  (Though to be sure, paedagically useful in demystifying democracy.). Voters, like consumers, exist outside of time or at a point in time, performing a function statically; there is no discovery process, learning, ignorance, asymmetric information.  Voters are like the neoclassical price taking producers, whose actions have no effect on outcomes.

I once asked one of my favorite frenemies, reason editor Katherine Mangu-Ward, if her critique of voting (derived from the work of economist Bryan Caplan and others), wasn’t arithmetically and logically unassailable, and yet false and irrelevant.  It’s not voting that is worthwhile, but campaigning:  it’s an empirical issue of whether 100 hours or $1000 donated to reason magazine, or the Mercatus Center (where public choice theory is articulated), or to a candidate or referendum calling for ending the drug war, stirs more people to rethink the issues.  The critique of voting abstracts from candidates, canvassing and campaigning, just as the neoclassical model of perfect competition leaves out innovating firms, consumers discovering new needs, desires, goods and services, entrepreneurs discovering new factors of production, etc.

Which leads me to wonder if public choice theory has also been over simplifying things.  I don’t know since after years of reading articles about it, or even hearing James Buchanan speak (to my senior high school math class actually, long ago), I’ve only just started reading it.  But I am struck by how in initial formulations the public choice theorist analyzes her “market” of interactions between voters, politicians, bureaucrats, and special interest groups, and simplifies the way they actually behave.

For example, there are “profit-making” behaviors of politicians that seem to be left out of introductory public choice discussions, in which politicians are simply described as lying for votes and buying votes and donors by stealing from taxpayers to give out subsidies.  I am struck by how this model leaves out two or three major aspects of politician behavior.

The first is how politicians create barriers to entry for competitors, from ballot access laws, character assassination by digging up dirt on potential rivals, and above all, by amassing a huge war chest in a candidate PAC so that no one will waste time running against them.  A politician doesn’t need to buy votes if instead you buy donors who fund such a huge war chest that no serious rival will emerge even if voters don’t approve of you.

Second is how politicians and political assemblies themselves are examples of the regulatory capture public choice economists use to describe bureaucracies.  Recently there has been a lot of evidence that the stock portfolios of elected officials always outperform the market, because they possess insider information about what laws and policies they will promulgate that change the values of firms and stocks.  Aren’t legislatures themselves now bureaucracies that are captured by a politically connected subset of the investor class, who will always inflate the currency to keep stock prices up, and pass laws that favor the stocks they invest in, knowing that those stocks will be favored by their legislation?

And then there is assassination, the ultimate barrier to entry, which Roger Stone now tells us LBJ committed (he also used the FCC to enrich his wife).  How do these large, historically specific, institutional features of particular national political processes fit into public choice theory?

Robert Caro Sins By Omission

ROBERT CARO SINS BY OMISSION
Robert Caro

By Roger Stone

As my book The Man Who Killed Kennedy: The Case Against LBJ has become an Amazon Top 100 best seller (# 18 at this writing) I have been asked again and again how Lyndon Johnson’s definitive biographer Robert Caro could have missed LBJ’s role in an assassination plot.

Yet, Caro’s masterful biography is flawed. There were two enormous scandals surrounding LBJ in the fall of 1963. One involved Secretary of the Senate, Bobby Baker, once described by Johnson as “my strong right arm” and the other involved the Texas wheeler-dealer, Billie Sol Estes. A review of news coverage of both scandals reveals substantially more column inches dedicated to coverage of the Billy Sol Estes scandal, yet nowhere in his biography does Caro even mention Sol Estes. Perhaps this is because Baker never testified against Johnson and served his prison sentence without comment while Billie Sol Estes served his prison term but later testified before a grand jury detailing Johnson’s role in the murder of U.S. Agriculture Department official Henry Marshall and President John F. Kennedy. Sol Estes also wrote to the Justice Department outlining the serial murders committed by LBJ. Time for Robert Caro to ‘fess up.

TO READ MORE go to: The StoneZone

To order the Man Who Killed Kennedy – The Case Against LBJ,
by Roger Stone with Mike Colapietro —
 Go Here

The Man Who Killed Kennedy

11 May

The Man Who Killed Kennedy

Overview

 

Find out how and why LBJ had JFK assassinated.

 

Lyndon Baines Johnson was a man of great ambition and enormous greed, both of which, in 1963, would threaten to destroy him. In the end, President Johnson would use power from his personal connections in Texas and from the underworld and from the government to escape an untimely end in politics and to seize even greater power. President Johnson, the thirty-sixth president of the United States, was …

 See more details below

Florida – Roger Stone to run as Libertarian

14 Feb
February 7, 2013 @National Review Online    
Roger Stone, an infamous political consultant, tells National Review Online that he will probably run for governor of Florida.

The former campaign adviser to Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan says he wants to run as a libertarian, third-party challenger to incumbent Republican governor Rick Scott and the Democratic nominee.

“I don’t have any illusions about winning, but I’d like to carry the flag for the liberty movement,” Stone says. “The Republican party is dead and it can’t be revived, so it’s time for the Libertarian party to be a force.”

Stone will make a final decision on a gubernatorial run by the end of the year. In the meantime, he’ll ask libertarian activists for their support.

His politics have evolved since he once practiced the “black arts,” as Stone describes his past activities, for Nixon and other Republican contenders. He now supports marijuana legalization and open borders; on social issues, he is pro-choice and pro-gay-marriage. He’s also a fiscal hawk and detests “Beltway Republicans” for their frequent “spending orgies.”

“If I run, I’m going to be provocative, and I’m going to punch up,” he says. “It’s going to be like Bill Buckley’s mayoral run in 1965. I’m going to have a lot of fun with this campaign. It’s going to get people’s attention.”

Stone, a former adviser to Libertarian-party presidential candidate Gary Johnson, is confident that he can cause serious trouble for Scott and the probable Democratic nominee, Charlie Crist (like Stone, a former Republican).

“If I’m on the ballot, you won’t be able to shrug at my candidacy,” he says. “And if I’m on the Web and TV, and I’m entertaining, then watch out.”

“Crist is a chameleon who thinks he’s going to have a coronation, and Scott is trying to kiss up to the teachers’ unions,” Stone adds. “Come next year, Floridians are going to ask whether this is really the best they can do.”


“Will this be a lark? Maybe,” Stone admits. “But let’s remember that people thought Marco Rubio’s campaign a few years ago was a lark, too.” 

Roger Stone to run as Libertarian

14 Feb

February 7, 2013 @National Review Online    
Roger Stone, an infamous political consultant, tells National Review Online that he will probably run for governor of Florida.

The former campaign adviser to Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan says he wants to run as a libertarian, third-party challenger to incumbent Republican governor Rick Scott and the Democratic nominee.

“I don’t have any illusions about winning, but I’d like to carry the flag for the liberty movement,” Stone says. “The Republican party is dead and it can’t be revived, so it’s time for the Libertarian party to be a force.”

Stone will make a final decision on a gubernatorial run by the end of the year. In the meantime, he’ll ask libertarian activists for their support.

His politics have evolved since he once practiced the “black arts,” as Stone describes his past activities, for Nixon and other Republican contenders. He now supports marijuana legalization and open borders; on social issues, he is pro-choice and pro-gay-marriage. He’s also a fiscal hawk and detests “Beltway Republicans” for their frequent “spending orgies.”

“If I run, I’m going to be provocative, and I’m going to punch up,” he says. “It’s going to be like Bill Buckley’s mayoral run in 1965. I’m going to have a lot of fun with this campaign. It’s going to get people’s attention.”

Stone, a former adviser to Libertarian-party presidential candidate Gary Johnson, is confident that he can cause serious trouble for Scott and the probable Democratic nominee, Charlie Crist (like Stone, a former Republican).

“If I’m on the ballot, you won’t be able to shrug at my candidacy,” he says. “And if I’m on the Web and TV, and I’m entertaining, then watch out.”

“Crist is a chameleon who thinks he’s going to have a coronation, and Scott is trying to kiss up to the teachers’ unions,” Stone adds. “Come next year, Floridians are going to ask whether this is really the best they can do.”

“Will this be a lark? Maybe,” Stone admits. “But let’s remember that people thought Marco Rubio’s campaign a few years ago was a lark, too.” 

Roger Stone on Johnson campaign

12 Feb


I spent 40 years in the corroded rectum of the two party system. I was the guy the Republican party turned to when things got tough. I saw first hand how the two major parties worked together to limit voter choices and exclude minor party candidates from the election dialogue. 

I helped kill the Reform Party by ending their access to federal funding in 2000. I watched the mass media’s total lack of interest in covering the policy pronouncements or campaigns of anyone other than Republicans or Democrats. 

I remember well how the Clinton and Dole campaigns has worked together to block Ross Perot from the 1996 debates by changing the rules of the Commission on Presidential debates to exclude the diminutive Texas billionaire. 

I recognized the extent to which the two parties control ballot access, Republicans and Democrats having written the laws governing who get’s on the ballot and how. I also recognized how the Commission on Presidential Debates is a wholly owned subsidiary of the two major parties who have no interest in letting a candidate who offers an alternative to the two parties any exposure that might win them votes. 

I also recognized the extent to which both major parties had morphed into one big government party, both supporting expensive foreign interventionism, continued deficit spending, the continued erosion of our civil liberties through the Patriot Act and the National Defense Authorization Act, the failed federal war on drugs and the defense of a loop-hole ridden tax system that discouraged growth and is largely confiscatory. 

As for my beloved Republican Party, I recognized how their misguided policies on immigration would leave us a “white man’s party” unable to win votes other than those of white voters (which everyone seems to have figured out since election day). 

Well aware of the odds against success, I decided to change my registration to the Libertarian Party. The Libertarians had the most compelling and qualified candidate in their history; former two term New Mexico Governor Gary Johnson who had governed his state with libertarian principles, cut spending and regulation and boosted his state to being #1 in job creation according to a study by the National Review. Johnson is credible, articulate, affable and hard working. 

Most importantly he was an open borders man who, unlike the GOP candidate was not subject to the fatal flaw of the GOP. He was an articulate critic of “building a wall ” as a solution to our immigration policies. 

As his running mate Johnson chose former California Superior Court Judge Jim Gray, probably the most articulate critic of the Federal war on drugs in the country today. Gray proved to be a dogged and effective campaigner. 

I was well aware of the difficulty of getting Johnson and Gray on the ballot and the 51 state laws governing ballot access written by Republicans and Democrats, administered by election officials who are Republicans and Democrats and overseen by judges who are Republicans and Democrats. In Michigan, one of only two states where Johnson met the criteria for ballot access, the Republican Attorney general was both the Romney campaign state Chairman and appeared in court to block the Libertarian Party from being on the Michigan ballot. 

Ross Perot navigated this in 1992 but it cost $10 million. Donald Trump looked at it last year and decided it would take $10 million even with his high name ID. Besides Trump already had a nicer plane and a nicer house. 

Johnson and the Libertarian Party would ultimately win a place on 48 state ballots. When Oklahoma Libertarians failed to secure enough signatures and lost a bid to win ballot access in court, Johnson campaign Senior Advisor Ron Nielson convinced the Oklahoma chapter of America Elect, who had collected 75,000 signatures, to designated Governor Johnson as their candidate only to have the State’s highest court void the ballot position in total violation of state law. Indeed, Oklahoma has allowed no minor party candidate a place on the ballot since 1972. 

Becoming well known in America is much tougher than you think . Johnson was inexplicably blocked from the GOP debates-perhaps because the narrative of a pro-choice, pro-gay marriage equality, pro-marijuana Republican didn’t fit the script. He began the race with little public awareness. 

Poll after Poll should voters unhappy with both parties and open to another choice. The same poll showed majority support for Johnson’s issue positions, particularly ending the war in Afghanistan, an end to deficit spending and an immediate balanced budget and the legalization of marijuana. 

Despite his strenuous campaigning and a fair amount of regional media coverage, 75% of voters were unaware of Johnson’s candidacy on Election Day. The Mainstream media largely ignored Johnson’s candidacy. 

There were only two answers to Johnson’s political dilemma. His campaign had to gain admission to the debates or raise the $10 million needed for network TV advertising. Campaign fundraising was sluggish, hampered by Ron Paul staying in the GOP race after it was clear Romney had a lock on the Republican nomination. Johnson would raise $2.5 million for the general election, not enough for network television. 

Johnson filed two federal lawsuits to gain admission to the debates- both on grounds not previously attempted by Ralph Nader or Pat Buchanan, earlier third party candidates. The first suit, an anti-trust action filed in California was dismissed by a Republican Judge first appointed to the bench by Gov. Pete Wilson and elevated to the federal bench by President George W. Bush. There is no evidence the Judge even read the pleadings. The second action remains pending and may allow a Libertarian candidate to participate in the televised debates in 2016. 

In the end Johnson garnered 1.2 million votes, almost twice what the Bob Barr/Wayne Allyn Root ticket pulled in 2008, but fell far short of the 5 % needed to secure the federal funding which would solve the problems the party faced in 2012. 

“Money is the mother’s milk of politics” said California’s legendary Assembly Speaker Jess Unruh. In the end, Gov. Gary Johnson never had the money or debate podium to gain the public attention necessary to sell his already palatable issue positions and candidacy-and that is a shame. Now I know how Teddy Roosevelt felt when he became a Bull Moose. 

I talked to FOX about the difficulty of mounting a third party candidacy: 

Roger Stone on Johnson campaign

12 Feb


I spent 40 years in the corroded rectum of the two party system. I was the guy the Republican party turned to when things got tough. I saw first hand how the two major parties worked together to limit voter choices and exclude minor party candidates from the election dialogue. 

I helped kill the Reform Party by ending their access to federal funding in 2000. I watched the mass media’s total lack of interest in covering the policy pronouncements or campaigns of anyone other than Republicans or Democrats. 

I remember well how the Clinton and Dole campaigns has worked together to block Ross Perot from the 1996 debates by changing the rules of the Commission on Presidential debates to exclude the diminutive Texas billionaire. 

I recognized the extent to which the two parties control ballot access, Republicans and Democrats having written the laws governing who get’s on the ballot and how. I also recognized how the Commission on Presidential Debates is a wholly owned subsidiary of the two major parties who have no interest in letting a candidate who offers an alternative to the two parties any exposure that might win them votes. 

I also recognized the extent to which both major parties had morphed into one big government party, both supporting expensive foreign interventionism, continued deficit spending, the continued erosion of our civil liberties through the Patriot Act and the National Defense Authorization Act, the failed federal war on drugs and the defense of a loop-hole ridden tax system that discouraged growth and is largely confiscatory. 

As for my beloved Republican Party, I recognized how their misguided policies on immigration would leave us a “white man’s party” unable to win votes other than those of white voters (which everyone seems to have figured out since election day). 

Well aware of the odds against success, I decided to change my registration to the Libertarian Party. The Libertarians had the most compelling and qualified candidate in their history; former two term New Mexico Governor Gary Johnson who had governed his state with libertarian principles, cut spending and regulation and boosted his state to being #1 in job creation according to a study by the National Review. Johnson is credible, articulate, affable and hard working. 

Most importantly he was an open borders man who, unlike the GOP candidate was not subject to the fatal flaw of the GOP. He was an articulate critic of “building a wall ” as a solution to our immigration policies. 

As his running mate Johnson chose former California Superior Court Judge Jim Gray, probably the most articulate critic of the Federal war on drugs in the country today. Gray proved to be a dogged and effective campaigner. 

I was well aware of the difficulty of getting Johnson and Gray on the ballot and the 51 state laws governing ballot access written by Republicans and Democrats, administered by election officials who are Republicans and Democrats and overseen by judges who are Republicans and Democrats. In Michigan, one of only two states where Johnson met the criteria for ballot access, the Republican Attorney general was both the Romney campaign state Chairman and appeared in court to block the Libertarian Party from being on the Michigan ballot. 

Ross Perot navigated this in 1992 but it cost $10 million. Donald Trump looked at it last year and decided it would take $10 million even with his high name ID. Besides Trump already had a nicer plane and a nicer house. 

Johnson and the Libertarian Party would ultimately win a place on 48 state ballots. When Oklahoma Libertarians failed to secure enough signatures and lost a bid to win ballot access in court, Johnson campaign Senior Advisor Ron Nielson convinced the Oklahoma chapter of America Elect, who had collected 75,000 signatures, to designated Governor Johnson as their candidate only to have the State’s highest court void the ballot position in total violation of state law. Indeed, Oklahoma has allowed no minor party candidate a place on the ballot since 1972. 

Becoming well known in America is much tougher than you think . Johnson was inexplicably blocked from the GOP debates-perhaps because the narrative of a pro-choice, pro-gay marriage equality, pro-marijuana Republican didn’t fit the script. He began the race with little public awareness. 

Poll after Poll should voters unhappy with both parties and open to another choice. The same poll showed majority support for Johnson’s issue positions, particularly ending the war in Afghanistan, an end to deficit spending and an immediate balanced budget and the legalization of marijuana. 

Despite his strenuous campaigning and a fair amount of regional media coverage, 75% of voters were unaware of Johnson’s candidacy on Election Day. The Mainstream media largely ignored Johnson’s candidacy. 

There were only two answers to Johnson’s political dilemma. His campaign had to gain admission to the debates or raise the $10 million needed for network TV advertising. Campaign fundraising was sluggish, hampered by Ron Paul staying in the GOP race after it was clear Romney had a lock on the Republican nomination. Johnson would raise $2.5 million for the general election, not enough for network television. 

Johnson filed two federal lawsuits to gain admission to the debates- both on grounds not previously attempted by Ralph Nader or Pat Buchanan, earlier third party candidates. The first suit, an anti-trust action filed in California was dismissed by a Republican Judge first appointed to the bench by Gov. Pete Wilson and elevated to the federal bench by President George W. Bush. There is no evidence the Judge even read the pleadings. The second action remains pending and may allow a Libertarian candidate to participate in the televised debates in 2016. 

In the end Johnson garnered 1.2 million votes, almost twice what the Bob Barr/Wayne Allyn Root ticket pulled in 2008, but fell far short of the 5 % needed to secure the federal funding which would solve the problems the party faced in 2012. 

“Money is the mother’s milk of politics” said California’s legendary Assembly Speaker Jess Unruh. In the end, Gov. Gary Johnson never had the money or debate podium to gain the public attention necessary to sell his already palatable issue positions and candidacy-and that is a shame. Now I know how Teddy Roosevelt felt when he became a Bull Moose. 

I talked to FOX about the difficulty of mounting a third party candidacy: