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De-Annexation Rally in Nashville this morning

25 Jul
Meeting is scheduled for July 25, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. in Room 30 at Legislative Plaza.

Libertarian attendees need to meet up at 9:AM to be properly organized and visible in the seats.

http://www.tn.gov/tacir/meeting.html

As the Memphis Commercial Appeal reports 

Activists who want to make it easier for neighborhoods in Shelby County to break away from larger governments failed to gather the nearly 90,000 signatures required to place the measure on the Aug. 5 ballot.
Joshua Fox, a leader of the “de-annexation” effort, said organizers didn’t meet the June deadline for the ballot.
“It’s almost impossible to get 90,000 signatures in three months,” he said.
The organizers now plan to take the proposal to Shelby County’s state representatives and senators when the Tennessee General Assembly reconvenes in January. They’ll propose a change in state law that would apply only to Shelby County.
“We’re going to try to show our state representatives that this is the will of Shelby County,” he said.
Joshua Fox led the petition drive with his brother Joseph. The 30-year-old identical twins work as Shelby County sheriff’s deputies and are sons of Ted Fox, the county’s director of public works.
Groups including the Campaign for Liberty and the Memphis Tea Party supported the effort.
The proposal revived a decades-old debate over annexation, the process through which Memphis and other municipalities seize territory and expand in size.
The legal battle over Memphis’ efforts to annex Hickory Hill dragged on from 1987 until 1998, when the city won.
The process affects city services such as garbage collection and influences which schools children attend.
The Fox brothers proposed an amendment to the Shelby County charter which would make it impossible for cities and towns to annex a territory without the approval of the people who live there.
Any unincorporated territory in the county with at least 1,500 residents could hold a referendum on whether to incorporate. And an area could break away from a larger entity if three-quarters of voters agreed.
The Shelby County Election Commission formally received the Fox brothers’ proposal in December and activists began gathering signatures at places ranging from a grocery store to a gun show.
But they later submitted slightly different ballot language to the election commission. In March, the commission required them to start from scratch and gave them 75 days to gather nearly 90,000 more signatures.
The election commission never received the signatures, elections administrator Richard Holden said.
Activists collected close to 35,000 signatures and continue to gather them even now, Fox said. They plan to use them to help show state representatives that citizens support de-annexation.
Under current law, any of the incorporated governments in Shelby County could file suit to stop the proposed charter amendment from being enforced, John Ryder, an attorney for the election commission, said earlier this year.
But changing state law could help clear potential legal challenges, Fox said.
Ryder agreed.
“Annexation is a process that is defined by state law,” he said. “So if you change state law, you change the process.”
— Daniel Connolly: 529-5296

Comments » 31

MaxPowers writes:
In other words, they want to be able to realize the benefits of a city without paying their fair share for it. Sorry folks, it doesn’t work that way.
Guardian1 writes:
I would have loved to sign it if I had known about it.
Midtowner writes:
If the judges would actually follow the current annexation laws it would be a moot point.
You don’t actually need a new law requiring a vote by the people being annexed. You just need to get the judges to follow the current law!
If the judges were to actually follow TN law on annexation, annexation would be much more difficult.
6-51-102. Annexation by ordinance.
(a) (1) A municipality, when petitioned by a majority of the residents and property owners of the affected territory, or upon its own initiative when it appears that the prosperity of such municipality AND territory will be materially retarded AND the safety and welfare of the inhabitants and property endangered, after notice and public hearing, by ordinance, may extend its corporate limits by annexation of such territory adjoining its existing boundaries as may be deemed necessary for the welfare of the residents and property owners of the affected territory as well as the municipality as a whole; … (emphasis mine).
Now who really thinks that the prosperity of the any territory in the county will be materially retarded without annexation? Who thinks that the safety and welfare of the inhabitants of the territory and that property in the territory is endangered that it requires annexation? Who thinks that it is really necessary for the “welfare” of the people being annexed?
Memphis needs to take care of what it already has rather than spread out the resources even more.
Guardian1 writes:
in response to MaxPowers:
In other words, they want to be able to realize the benefits of a city without paying their fair share for it. Sorry folks, it doesn’t work that way.
Have you noticed with each area that is annexed that it becomes more difficult for Memphis to manage? Especially difficult with the school system. Memphis may get more money but then they also have more bills. There is no financial gain for Memphis or the area being annexed. If Memphis was a small city, it would be easier to care for. When I lived in Cordova, I paid for every service that I used
38104#209890 writes:
How many of those 35,000 “signatures” were worth the paper they were scribbled on ? We’ll never know. 
Thank goodness this foolishness died. What a harebrained idea. We haven’t seen anything this silly since the “toy town” initiative.
monalisa writes:
Tea Partiers, Thanks…keep talking! The more you speak, the fewer you are.
ohknow writes:
These deannexation people are obviously misguided: look how well it worked out in HIckory Hill after it was annexed.
Hummm writes:
in response to ohknow:
These deannexation people are obviously misguided: look how well it worked out in HIckory Hill after it was annexed.
Go back further and Whitehaven is another shining example of the benefits of annexation.
I bet poor Germantown and Bartlett whish they had been annexed instead of incorporating. Imagine all the amenities they miss out on.
Longgone2006 writes:
In unrelated news. Property values in Fayette County continue to rise.
midsouthsportssupporter writes:
I grew up in Hickory Hill and went to Kirby High School in the 80’s. I came back 15 years later to teach there. Wow the benefits of annexation were apparent. The school was the same, in name only. The tough academics and disciplined Shelby County Students of the 80’s were replaced by non-caring, undisciplined, systematic kids always looking for the easy way out. The parents didn’t care much either. My parents old home lost $20,000 in property value over the same 15 years (good thing they moved out in 1991). The worn down look of the neighborhoods is strictly negligence of a non-caring population. The new parks created by the city were nice though. Of course no one was using them anytime I drove past them.
The Hickory Hill annexation benefited no one in the long run.
ExMemphian2010 writes:
People I am sorry to bring you bad news. But Memphis will never be a decent city again. It is on a downward spiral out of control. Just like Detroit will not be a decent city again. Unqualified employment pool, high drop out rate, high crime, high unemployment, do I need to metion more? The city voted to long for candidates that promise the world but couldnt produce anything of substance. How much money was wasted on trying to bring a national football team to the city to just in return leave? How much money has been wasted on the vast community centers? How much money has been wasted on the NBA team? How much does that team actually bring into the city? To the downtown area, and surrounding areas, from hotels etc? I bet you are not even close to date on how much the city paid to build that parking garage and building. How much money has been wasted on the downtown that hasnt produced?
terry#217463 writes:
in response to MaxPowers:
In other words, they want to be able to realize the benefits of a city without paying their fair share for it. Sorry folks, it doesn’t work that way.
I can’t imagine what “benefits” you think Memphis has to offer. Like most citizens i would gladly forfiet being able to visit the zoo, Mud Island, Autozone Park or the FEDEX Forum for a reduction in taxes. The vast majority of the citizens do not benefit and do not care much about these amenities.
Forced annexation is wrong and you’d think Memphis would have gotten the point after what happened in Hickory Hill. If the city forces itself on the residents against their will, many will simply pick up and leave and thus begins the downward spiral of the area. Look at Whitehaven, Raleigh, Hickory Hill and now Cordova.
forwardmemphis writes:
Up until the end of Hackett’s term, annexation was about keeping a white majority in Memphis so as to prevent the election of a Black mayor. Interestingly, Herenton continued the practice, despite his blustery racial rhetoric. He may have been pragmatic, knowing that you can’t run a city without money, but he probably also realizes, though he won’t admit it, that cities must grow to remain viable, and cities must remain racially-integrated to remain viable. Ultimately, Memphis needs to surrender its charter to the state. This is an action that Shelby County residents would have no say in, and if Memphis’ ability to grow has been thwarted, and the city can no longer take in enough money to continue to provide services, they should simply cease to exist, and let the burden fall upon county government, where it should be anyway.
PhiAlpha97 writes:
in response to Midtowner:
If the judges would actually follow the current annexation laws it would be a moot point.
You don’t actually need a new law requiring a vote by the people being annexed. You just need to get the judges to follow the current law!
If the judges were to actually follow TN law on annexation, annexation would be much more difficult.
6-51-102. Annexation by ordinance.
(a) (1) A municipality, when petitioned by a majority of the residents and property owners of the affected territory, or upon its own initiative when it appears that the prosperity of such municipality AND territory will be materially retarded AND the safety and welfare of the inhabitants and property endangered, after notice and public hearing, by ordinance, may extend its corporate limits by annexation of such territory adjoining its existing boundaries as may be deemed necessary for the welfare of the residents and property owners of the affected territory as well as the municipality as a whole; … (emphasis mine).
Now who really thinks that the prosperity of the any territory in the county will be materially retarded without annexation? Who thinks that the safety and welfare of the inhabitants of the territory and that property in the territory is endangered that it requires annexation? Who thinks that it is really necessary for the “welfare” of the people being annexed?
Memphis needs to take care of what it already has rather than spread out the resources even more.
Agree, but to be fair. Unless someone wants to file suit, it takes 12 votes to annex contiguous areas. Burden of proof is on the prosecution not the defense.
TCoDude writes:
in response to ohknow:
These deannexation people are obviously misguided: look how well it worked out in HIckory Hill after it was annexed.
ROFLAO!!! That’s funny. 😀
bigwheel writes:
in response to midsouthsportssupporter:
I grew up in Hickory Hill and went to Kirby High School in the 80’s. I came back 15 years later to teach there. Wow the benefits of annexation were apparent. The school was the same, in name only. The tough academics and disciplined Shelby County Students of the 80’s were replaced by non-caring, undisciplined, systematic kids always looking for the easy way out. The parents didn’t care much either. My parents old home lost $20,000 in property value over the same 15 years (good thing they moved out in 1991). The worn down look of the neighborhoods is strictly negligence of a non-caring population. The new parks created by the city were nice though. Of course no one was using them anytime I drove past them.
The Hickory Hill annexation benefited no one in the long run.
Now, the big question is- WHY DID THIS COMMUNITY GO DOWN THE DRAIN ?
Ans.- Because the tax base ran away. Hickory Hill went down because the people who lived there were scared out of their homes. Had annexation happened in tough times as now, when home loans are tight, Hickory Hill and all of it’s folks would still be there.
TCoDude writes:
in response to terry#217463:
I can’t imagine what “benefits” you think Memphis has to offer. Like most citizens i would gladly forfiet being able to visit the zoo, Mud Island, Autozone Park or the FEDEX Forum for a reduction in taxes. The vast majority of the citizens do not benefit and do not care much about these amenities.
Forced annexation is wrong and you’d think Memphis would have gotten the point after what happened in Hickory Hill. If the city forces itself on the residents against their will, many will simply pick up and leave and thus begins the downward spiral of the area. Look at Whitehaven, Raleigh, Hickory Hill and now Cordova.
And, in comparison, look at Atoka, Munford, Southaven, West Memphis, etc
TCoDude writes:
in response to bigwheel:
Now, the big question is- WHY DID THIS COMMUNITY GO DOWN THE DRAIN ?
Ans.- Because the tax base ran away. Hickory Hill went down because the people who lived there were scared out of their homes. Had annexation happened in tough times as now, when home loans are tight, Hickory Hill and all of it’s folks would still be there.
Nah, if it is that tight, then they probably wouldn’t be able to afford the increased taxes anyway. So, they would do like so many others have done the past couple of years – just walk away.
CHJ writes:
Guys: It didn’t fail because you didn’t have enough time. It failed because no one agreed with you. Get over it.
TheHistorian (Inactive) writes:
People need to realize that annexation does not doom a neighborhood, but the type of development in the neighborhood does. When you pack a bunch of cheaply built apartment complexes and 1000 square foot (or smaller) homes into an area, its not going to last. This is why places like Whitehaven, Parkway Village, Hickory Hill, and parts of Cordova fail and places like East Memphis (the real East Memphis, CA) continue to prosper and thrive. Olive Branch is starting to find this out the hard way, and they can never be annexed by Memphis; their crime rate has skyrocketed due to the number of people moving into the smaller houses and apartments who are lower income. Drive down Goodman Rd. and look at all the Spanish language businesses in the strip malls- I have nothing wrong with Hispanics or anyone, but typically areas that have a greater number of immigrants, legal or illegal, have higher incidents of crime. This was true a century ago in the irish hoods my ancesters settled in, and its true now in immigrant neighborhoods. Its only a matter of time DeSoto. Are you going to start planning your developments more wisely now, or become Shelby south? Fayette, Tipton, take notice.
getdownmidtown writes:
How many people who are Memphis-bashing on here have a job in the city? How many people in the county work in Memphis? I do not believe that Fayette County is a completely self-supporting community, with enough jobs to keep all its residents drawing paychecks. I work in Memphis, I live in Memphis, and I pay taxes in Memphis. And I don’t whine about it. Now county taxes, that’s another matter entirely… I’m tired of funding services I am not allowed to use. One metropolitan government. Get on it.
nicholas.vescovo#681685 writes:
in response to getdownmidtown:
How many people who are Memphis-bashing on here have a job in the city? How many people in the county work in Memphis? I do not believe that Fayette County is a completely self-supporting community, with enough jobs to keep all its residents drawing paychecks. I work in Memphis, I live in Memphis, and I pay taxes in Memphis. And I don’t whine about it. Now county taxes, that’s another matter entirely… I’m tired of funding services I am not allowed to use. One metropolitan government. Get on it.
Good point here.
@terry#217463 – do you work in Memphis? Do your children or family members work in Memphis? You never come into the city for anything? You spend all your time outside city limits? Be honest here. You say you don’t care about any of those thing, but do you want roads to drive on and a police force? Then pony up your share.
Midtownblues (Inactive) writes:
in response to Avenger:
(This comment was removed by the site staff.)
Ha…prove it to me, go put on some lipstick and we’ll see.
I live in a great neighborhood that has been part of the city of Memphis for over 100 years, and my office is in another part of Memphis that has been around almost as long. I subsidize the people in the county with my taxes, and all they do is complain about it when it comes time for them to pay their share.
Puppy writes:
in response to Longgone2006:
In unrelated news. Property values in Fayette County continue to rise.
Keep posting that. Eventually you will convince yourself that Fayette County isn’t a redneck sh*thole.
ultimatedemand#628570 writes:
in response to Tigertommy:
(This comment was removed by the site staff.)
Start with Shelby County Schools. Your child can’t attend a Shebly County school if you dont live in the county. The county schools are funded with a portion of CITY tax dollars.
Puppy writes:
in response to TheHistorian:
People need to realize that annexation does not doom a neighborhood, but the type of development in the neighborhood does. When you pack a bunch of cheaply built apartment complexes and 1000 square foot (or smaller) homes into an area, its not going to last. This is why places like Whitehaven, Parkway Village, Hickory Hill, and parts of Cordova fail and places like East Memphis (the real East Memphis, CA) continue to prosper and thrive. Olive Branch is starting to find this out the hard way, and they can never be annexed by Memphis; their crime rate has skyrocketed due to the number of people moving into the smaller houses and apartments who are lower income. Drive down Goodman Rd. and look at all the Spanish language businesses in the strip malls- I have nothing wrong with Hispanics or anyone, but typically areas that have a greater number of immigrants, legal or illegal, have higher incidents of crime. This was true a century ago in the irish hoods my ancesters settled in, and its true now in immigrant neighborhoods. Its only a matter of time DeSoto. Are you going to start planning your developments more wisely now, or become Shelby south? Fayette, Tipton, take notice.
So true. I cringe when I drive past these giant apartment complexes. No good can come of that. 
Honestly, renters are just not good for a neighborhood. Rentals should be sprinkled into an area – not all grouped together.
HerbertEKookJr writes:
in response to ultimatedemand#628570:
Start with Shelby County Schools. Your child can’t attend a Shebly County school if you dont live in the county. The county schools are funded with a portion of CITY tax dollars.
Like the over $750 a year that my COUNTY tax bill on my GERMANTOWN home says goes to MEMPHIS CITY SCHOOLS?
GoodHabits writes:
in response to Hummm:
Go back further and Whitehaven is another shining example of the benefits of annexation.
I bet poor Germantown and Bartlett whish they had been annexed instead of incorporating. Imagine all the amenities they miss out on.
Can you go back as far as Frayser? I keep hearing that Memphis still has not honored all the promises to that community.
forwardmemphis writes:
in response to Tigertommy:
(This comment was removed by the site staff.)
How about the Shelby County Schools, which just about everyone in and out of Memphis believes to be superior to the Memphis City Schools? No Memphis child may attend a Shelby County School unless he has a parent or guardian employed in the district (or lies about his address).
MemphisChik08 writes:
in response to MaxPowers:
In other words, they want to be able to realize the benefits of a city without paying their fair share for it. Sorry folks, it doesn’t work that way.
I pay county taxes and benefit from the county services only. There are no Memphis city services to which I subscribe and I do not need them. Don’t force me to live in a city I specifically choose not to be part of.
MemphisChik08 writes:
in response to bigwheel:
Now, the big question is- WHY DID THIS COMMUNITY GO DOWN THE DRAIN ?
Ans.- Because the tax base ran away. Hickory Hill went down because the people who lived there were scared out of their homes. Had annexation happened in tough times as now, when home loans are tight, Hickory Hill and all of it’s folks would still be there.
Do you think doubling someone’s taxes during tough times, for little to no change in the services they receive, is going to keep them still? As a single mother with a child not yet school age, I cannot afford anything else leaving my wallet. If my taxes are doubled, I won’t have a choice but to walk away from my home, credit report be damned…
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New Hampshire Liberty Party convenes

19 Feb
I’ve joined, on line anyway, the New Hampshire Liberty Party, which seems to include libertarians and allow you to be a member of another party simultaneously.  They seem to be Free State Projectish, advocating that New Hampshire leave the United States.

Wait!  I thought proglodytes told me only racist neo-Confederate southerners were secessionists!

I have a personal carpetbagger question for readers too:  should I move to Virginia and run for Delegate in 2013 even if I move back to DC and run for office there in 2014?

  • In accordance with Article 5 of the bylaws of the NH Liberty Party, the NHLP Annual Convention shall take place during the Free State Project’s Liberty Forum.
    This year, the convention will be held on Saturday Feb 23 from 5-7 pm.
    The new State Committee shall be elected, and the members may choose to amend the bylaws.

    Attendance: Attendance to the the Liberty Forum is not required to attend the NHLP Annual Convention. The particular room for the NHLP convention has yet to officially be determined.

Nashua, New Hampshire 03063