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The Latest Leftover Brain Fart – Poison Government Supplied Water a Plot by Libertarians

3 Aug
Despite governments spending trillions to regulate health and safety, kids are shot at schools, bridges and tunnels collapse, imported pet food and toys are poison, plants and workplaces explode.

And government monopoly municipal water authorities supply bacteria, lead and toxin laced water.  At the leftover blog Americans Against the Tea Party they are blaming this on Libertarians.  AATP is itself a toxin, one of several websites, like Addicting Info, that have a stable of unknown, bio-less writers and dark funding (SEIU?  Podesta’s?), that spam people with dozens of fallacy smeared articles every day.

And their masters give us poison government monopoly water.  Back in 2004 in Washington, DC they even threatened to fire their employees if they went public about it.  Eric Holder, then an attorney at the ruling class law firm Covington and Burlington, was the PR spinner for the government water authority, trying to prevent a giant class action lawsuit by women and children who had been drinking lead for months.

Toledo’s water is now toxic because of algae growth alleged to have been stimulated by run off from fertilizers.  In other words, the lakes and other public properties mismanaged by the government have become a receptacle and vector for pollution, like state managed property everywhere (now actually EPA managed property, since the federal government claims it owns all waterways).  Streets and sidewalks and schools and other “public property” have long been the vectors and breeding grounds for litter, rats, pests, vermin, muggers, rapists, vandals, pickpockets, etc.  If public properties were privately owned, you could sue people for trespass when they pollute your property.

DC’s centrally planned medical marijuana exchange has a glitchy portal

25 Oct

Is D.C.’s medical pot program going up in smoke?

By   @@WashingtonBlade.com
Capital City Care, gay news, Washington Blade, medical marijuana

Medical marijuana is available at Capital City Care. (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)














Only 59 patients have applied and been approved for the District’s medical marijuana program since it finally launched four months ago. As currently set up and based on the participation rate, it is an unsustainable business model.
On Monday the owner of Capital City Care testified at a D.C. Council health committee public hearing that his medical marijuana business, like two other dispensaries in operation, is losing money and more patients are needed to keep the doors open. His was the first of three distribution centers that opened in the nation’s capital, of a maximum eight allowed. The storefront dispensary, in a converted townhouse on North Capitol Street, N.W., enjoys a view of the U.S. Capitol from its doorstep.
An owner of one of the separate cultivation centers licensed to grow medical marijuana indicated, “all we have been doing is bleeding cash.”
Officials had predicted that 800 patients would sign up, with subsequent increases of 50 percent in each of five subsequent years. Some thought those projections were modest.
Unless enterprise conditions change and the surprisingly low level of patient participation increases, the entire medical marijuana program may go up in smoke.
It took 15 years for D.C.’s voter-authorized medical marijuana program to go into effect. Following approval of a ballot initiative in 1998 with 69 percent support, Congress banned implementation for nine successive years utilizing oversight authority over District legislation. When the prohibition was lifted in 2009, it took the city government more than three years to establish regulations.
D.C. officials instituted the nation’s most restrictive rules compared to the 20 states that have enacted laws legalizing medical marijuana programs. Home cultivation, approved by voters as part of Initiative 59, was not included.
Access is restricted to D.C. residents diagnosed with HIV or AIDS, cancer, glaucoma or suffering from a condition causing severe muscle spasms, such as multiple sclerosis. Potential patients must present a recommendation from an authorized doctor licensed and practicing in the city for approval by the D.C. Department of Health. Fewer than 70 doctors have so far indicated interest in participating. The regulations prohibit identifying doctors able to prescribe marijuana.
Expanded access advocates suggest adding medical conditions that would qualify for treatment. Included among these recommended ailments are epilepsy, post-traumatic stress disorder, Crohn’s disease, digestive ailments and migraine headaches. Of note, epilepsy is a qualifying condition in 17 of the states with medical marijuana programs.
Some proponents urge further expansion to additional pain-causing illnesses. Others worry that abandoning the city’s cautious regulatory approach and introducing lax eligibility policies might stir a quiet federal beast and provoke prosecutions.
Deterrents to participation also include a cumbersome application process and a requirement that doctors, patients and city-sanctioned growers and distributors sign an acknowledgement that the activity is in violation of federal law.
D.C. Council Committee on Health Chair Yvette Alexander voiced an important observation regarding the low participation level at a public hearing this week. She noted that despite a significant HIV and AIDS rate, for example, the number of those affected signing up is low, accounting for slightly more than half of the 59 participants.
Whatever the cause of low participation numbers, it is not clear that expansion of qualifying ailments and medical conditions would sufficiently increase participation numbers. Is market need fulfilled by illegal product acquisition? Was patient interest grossly miscalculated? Is the city’s culture too risk-averse for an activity that is in violation of federal law? Is registration with the government a unique obstacle in a town accustomed to diligent privacy protection?
The program’s future could also be complicated by D.C. Council or District voter approval of decriminalization or full legalization and home cultivation. Legislation has been introduced and potential ballot efforts have been announced for both propositions.
Consideration must be given to the possibility that actual patient demand may not prove sufficient to sustain a robust number of commercial business operations.
Mark Lee is a long-time entrepreneur and community business advocate. Follow on Twitter:@MarkLeeDC. Reach him at OurBusinessMatters@gmail.com.

Hayek and Keynes

21 Oct

Women disarmed by DC gun control, bike against government failure, tragedy of the commons

17 Oct





















FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASEContact: Renee Davidson Communications Director Collective Action for Safe Spaces renee@collectiveactiondc.org

Over 250 DC Women Expected to Participate in Grassroots Anti-Harassment Bike Event This Saturday, 10/19“19th Amendment Alleycat” will benefit local anti-street harassment group, Collective Action for Safe Spaces (CASS)
Washington, DC — This Saturday, October 19, over 250 women are expected to participate in “19th Amendment Alleycat,” or what might be the District’s first all-women alleycat. Organized by two women bikers who are active in the city’s cycling community, the grassroots event aims to help women feel comfortable and confident on the DC streets, especially when faced with public sexual harassment. The event offers a unique spin on alleycats, or “urban checkpoint races” which are similar to scavenger hunts and are traditionally dominated by men. Registration is $5 and benefits Collective Action for Safe Spaces (CASS), a local grassroots group that works to empower people in the DC metropolitan area to build a community free from public sexual harassment and assault.

Less about speed and more about strategy, the 19th Amendment Alleycat will include checkpoints throughout the city that center around events and locations related to DC’s role in the women’s rights movement. Participants will also be able to enter a raffle to win prizes from a range of sponsors. Male allies are encouraged to volunteer at check-points and join participants at the finish for a raffle (see raffle sponsors below) and an official after party.

“The 19th Amendment Alleycat aims to help raise awareness and foster dialogue about public sexual harassment, which is a widespread problem that severely limits women’s safety and restricts their mobility,” said CASS’s founder and executive director, Chai Shenoy. A study by CASS conducted this summer found that 90 percent of respondents report experiencing public sexual harassment in DC, including verbal harassment, leering, stalking and groping. “Since CASS was founded in 2009, we’ve received hundreds of stories of street harassment faced by DC residents, including by female bikers,” said Shenoy, pointing to stories of women being forced to change their bike routes to avoid sexual harassment, fearing sexual assaults along local bike trails and being stalked and dangerously harassed by strangers in cars. The event comes exactly one week after a similar all-women’s cycling event was held in Cairo, Egypt, in response to public sexual harassment.

In preparation for the DC alleycat, CASS collected stories of sexual harassment faced by women cyclists, as well as statements on how biking helps women feel empowered. At the same time that women cyclists often face street harassment, biking can be very empowering, and we look forward to women reclaiming the streets of DC this Saturday,” said Shenoy.

Sponsors and those donating items and raffle prizes to the 19th Amendment Alleycat include: Retail: All-City Cycle, Anhaica Bag Works, Ass Savers, Fabric Horse, Fiks:Reflective, Harlot Clothing Co., Knog, Kozie Prery, Oury Grips USA, Po Campo, Pure Fix Cycles, Road Runner Bags, Rockinoggins, Vaya Bags; Local Bike Shops: BicycleSPACE, CycleLife USA, Proteus Bicycles, The Bike Rack, Velocity Bicycle, Cooperative; Food and Bev: Honest Tea, KIND Bars; With support from: The Bike House, WABA Women & Bicycles.
The 19th Amendment Alleycat will begin at 2:00pm Saturday, October 19th, at Meridian Hill Park in NW DC. The event will last approximately two hours and will culminate with an official after party. Interested parties should RSVP on Facebook. More information can be found on CASS’s website: www.collectiveactiondc.org.
###
Founded in 2009 as HollaBackDC!, Collective Action for Safe Spaces (CASS) works to empower people in the DC metropolitan area to build a community free from public sexual harassment and assault. It does this through both online and offline activism, including workshops, innovative direct services, policy advocacy, and community outreach. Volunteer-led and -run, CASS utilizes the creativity and energy of the DC community to further its mission and vision. Follow CASS on Facebook and on Twitter.
Renee D. Davidson
Communications Director
Collective Action for Safe Spaces (CASS)
[e]  
reneeddavidson@gmail.com  

[w] www.collectiveactiondc.org
[t]  @SafeSpacesDC & @reneetheorizes

Take action to help empower people in the DC Metro area to build a community free from sexual harassment & assault.

Women bikers seeks to address government failure in providing safety in public spaces

17 Oct

October 17, 2013

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASEContact: Renee Davidson Communications Director Collective Action for Safe Spaces renee@collectiveactiondc.org

Over 250 DC Women Expected to Participate in Grassroots Anti-Harassment Bike Event This Saturday, 10/19“19th Amendment Alleycat” will benefit local anti-street harassment group, Collective Action for Safe Spaces (CASS)
Washington, DC — This Saturday, October 19, over 250 women are expected to participate in “19th Amendment Alleycat,” or what might be the District’s first all-women alleycat. Organized by two women bikers who are active in the city’s cycling community, the grassroots event aims to help women feel comfortable and confident on the DC streets, especially when faced with public sexual harassment. The event offers a unique spin on alleycats, or “urban checkpoint races” which are similar to scavenger hunts and are traditionally dominated by men. Registration is $5 and benefits Collective Action for Safe Spaces (CASS), a local grassroots group that works to empower people in the DC metropolitan area to build a community free from public sexual harassment and assault.

Less about speed and more about strategy, the 19th Amendment Alleycat will include checkpoints throughout the city that center around events and locations related to DC’s role in the women’s rights movement. Participants will also be able to enter a raffle to win prizes from a range of sponsors. Male allies are encouraged to volunteer at check-points and join participants at the finish for a raffle (see raffle sponsors below) and an official after party.

“The 19th Amendment Alleycat aims to help raise awareness and foster dialogue about public sexual harassment, which is a widespread problem that severely limits women’s safety and restricts their mobility,” said CASS’s founder and executive director, Chai Shenoy. A study by CASS conducted this summer found that 90 percent of respondents report experiencing public sexual harassment in DC, including verbal harassment, leering, stalking and groping. “Since CASS was founded in 2009, we’ve received hundreds of stories of street harassment faced by DC residents, including by female bikers,” said Shenoy, pointing to stories of women being forced to change their bike routes to avoid sexual harassment, fearing sexual assaults along local bike trails and being stalked and dangerously harassed by strangers in cars. The event comes exactly one week after a similar all-women’s cycling event was held in Cairo, Egypt, in response to public sexual harassment.

In preparation for the DC alleycat, CASS collected stories of sexual harassment faced by women cyclists, as well as statements on how biking helps women feel empowered. At the same time that women cyclists often face street harassment, biking can be very empowering, and we look forward to women reclaiming the streets of DC this Saturday,” said Shenoy.

Sponsors and those donating items and raffle prizes to the 19th Amendment Alleycat include: Retail: All-City Cycle, Anhaica Bag Works, Ass Savers, Fabric Horse, Fiks:Reflective, Harlot Clothing Co., Knog, Kozie Prery, Oury Grips USA, Po Campo, Pure Fix Cycles, Road Runner Bags, Rockinoggins, Vaya Bags; Local Bike Shops: BicycleSPACE, CycleLife USA, Proteus Bicycles, The Bike Rack, Velocity Bicycle, Cooperative; Food and Bev: Honest Tea, KIND Bars; With support from: The Bike House, WABA Women & Bicycles.
The 19th Amendment Alleycat will begin at 2:00pm Saturday, October 19th, at Meridian Hill Park in NW DC. The event will last approximately two hours and will culminate with an official after party. Interested parties should RSVP on Facebook. More information can be found on CASS’s website: www.collectiveactiondc.org.
###
Founded in 2009 as HollaBackDC!, Collective Action for Safe Spaces (CASS) works to empower people in the DC metropolitan area to build a community free from public sexual harassment and assault. It does this through both online and offline activism, including workshops, innovative direct services, policy advocacy, and community outreach. Volunteer-led and -run, CASS utilizes the creativity and energy of the DC community to further its mission and vision. Follow CASS on Facebook and on Twitter.

Renee D. Davidson
Communications Director
Collective Action for Safe Spaces (CASS)
[e]  
reneeddavidson@gmail.com  

[w] www.collectiveactiondc.org
[t]  @SafeSpacesDC & @reneetheorizes

Take action to help empower people in the DC Metro area to build a community free from sexual harassment & assault.

__._,_.___

We are from the government and we are here to …provide government failure

2 Aug

What’s Wrong With the Department of Licenses and Inspections?

muni%20services%20building%20mike%20smith.jpg
[Photo of Municipal Services building by Mike Smith]
Today, the City Council’s fourth hearing of a Special Investigations Committee took place. The topic of today’s investigations was the role that L&I played in the building collapse at 22nd and Market in May. After two more serious collapses (one at Temple and one in South Philly) in the last three months, it’s clear that something about Philly’s building codes or the way they’re enforced needs to be changed.

In a word? Sloth. Two former L&I commissioners testified at the hearing. One of them, Bennett Levin, who headed the department for three years in the nineties, felt that the failures of L&I were due to a lack of accountability and a surplus of laziness.
Additionally, Levin had some more concrete suggestions. One of these was requiring general and demolition contractors to have some sort of experience or certification. Though specialty contractors are required to provide proof of experience, general contractors do not.
It’s worth noting that Levin had a long career of alleging corruption and sloth throughout the city, and left L&I because of a scandal wherein his aides were accused of corruption.
· Former L&I commissioners detail problems in the department [Naked City] 

Did the FDA murder 32 Americans?

26 Jan
Economists have long produced studies on how having a state monopoly on quality assurance, instead of a vibrant market of competing consumer information providers, keeps new drugs off the market and raises their prices, leading to reduced health outcomes for everyone.

But the FDA also lets bad drugs on the market all the time, and doctors and patients are lulled into relying on them, thinking they are doing their job.


32 people died this winter from spinal meningitis.  And the FDA new about the problem for over 2 years.


As Hillary Clinton would say:  “What does it matter?”



FDA warning to meningitis-linked firm came long after inspection



BOSTON | Wed Nov 21, 2012 9:29am EST Reuters

Nov 21 (Reuters) – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration took 684 days to issue a warning letter after uncovering serious issues at the pharmacy at the center of the deadly U.S. meningitis outbreak, newly released documents showed.

The New England Compounding Center (NECC) chastised the FDA for taking so long, telling the agency its response time was nearly 18 months longer than the FDA’s average response, according to letters released by a Freedom of Information Act request from Reuters.

The FDA issued the warning letter in December 2006. It was based on an inspection of NECC that began in September 2004 and ended on Jan. 19, 2005, according to the documents.

“This prolonged gap between inspection and warning letters does not comply with FDA’s procedures,” NECC’s chief pharmacist, Barry Cadden, wrote in a Jan. 5, 2007 letter to FDA compliance officer Ann Simoneau.

In follow-up correspondence, FDA officials apologized for the “significant delay” in correspondence time between the inspection and the warning letter. While the FDA conceded the gap was unusual, it in no way diminished the regulator’s “serious concerns” about NECC’s pharmacy operations, documents showed.